EJK Mini-Grants - Apply Now

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Posted 2/13/2019

Contact:
Sheree Wichard
718-788-9585
Wichard.PR@gmail.com

2019 Ezra Jack Keats Mini-Grant Program Call for Proposals

Over $1,000,000 Given Directly to Educators at Public Schools and
Libraries Across the Country since 1987

2018 EJK Mini-Grant: Native American Youth in Oregon Carve Personal Totems

During Ghas-Tv-Xvm-Dvn (Deeni language for “The Places We Go”)

NEW YORK—February 14, 2019—The Ezra Jack Keats Foundation, dedicated to supporting arts and literacy programs in public schools and libraries across the country, is encouraging qualifying educators to apply for a 2019 Ezra Jack Keats Mini-Grant. Applications are currently being accepted, and the deadline for submissions is March 31, 2019.

Approximately 70 grants, up to $500 each, will be awarded to teachers and librarians whose proposals demonstrate creativity and a desire to make learning fun. Decisions will be emailed to all applicants in May, allowing educators to plan for the 2019 – 2020 academic year.
“For over three decades, it has been our privilege to support the vision of the most innovative teachers and librarians, who inspire students to read joyfully, think creatively and support one another with generosity,” says Deborah Pope, Executive Director of the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation.

Since 1987, the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation has provided over $1,000,000 in support of EJK Mini-Grant programs spanning the 50 states and U.S commonwealths. The Foundation welcomes Mini-Grant proposals focusing on any subject or discipline. To learn more about EJK Mini-Grants, and to see the criteria for application, visit Ezra Jack Keats Mini-Grants.

“With the deadline fast approaching, I encourage all creative educators who want to put their new ideas into action to go online and apply for an EJK Mini-Grant now,” adds Pope.

Following is a description of an outstanding 2018 Ezra Jack Keats Mini-Grant program, an exciting example of the work supported by EJK Mini-Grants:

Native American Youth in Lincoln County, Oregon Carve Personal Totems

An Ezra Jack Keats Mini-Grant made it possible for Native American students from three schools in Lincoln County, Oregon to meet together to carve personal totems during Ghas-Tv-Xvm (Deeni language for “The Places We Go.”). Students carved totem symbols into red terracotta clay (L) and added details in black and white underglaze (top R). They carved 22 clay totem pieces in all (bottom R), which were assembled into 4 totem poles approximately 6ft. tall.
An Ezra Jack Keats Mini-Grant made it possible for Native American students from three schools in Lincoln County, Oregon to meet together to carve personal totems during Ghas-Tv-Xvm (Deeni language for “The Places We Go.”). Students carved totem symbols into red terracotta clay (L) and added details in black and white underglaze (top R). They carved 22 clay totem pieces in all (bottom R), which were assembled into four totem poles approximately 6ft. tall. Photo by Crystal Taylor

An EJK Mini-Grant made it possible for Native American students from three different schools in Lincoln County, Oregon to meet together to carve personal totems during Ghas-Tv-Xvm (Deeni language for “The Places We Go.”)

This special event, led by Crystal Taylor, Lincoln County Indian Education coordinator and Liz Fox, IB Research & Curriculum Assistant at Newport High School, resulted in the carving of 22 separate clay totem pieces, which were assembled into four totem poles, each standing almost six feet tall. Taylor and Fox are working on the installation of the totem poles with the tribal headquarters along the Oregon coast.

Says Fox, who is a potter, “It was amazing to see how quickly the students caught on to sgraffito, an ancient carving technique. Clay is such a great vehicle for expression and their totems are a beautiful reflection of their native culture.”

“The EJK Mini-Grant enabled us to make the connections between our native community and art in a very public way, and to buy the supplies and tools we needed to make this happen. The students worked collaboratively on tasks while also expressing their individuality with a focus on how the totem collection would present an overall theme to the community.”

About the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation

Founded by Ezra Jack Keats, one of America’s greatest children’s book authors and illustrators, the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation fosters children’s love of reading and creative expression by supporting arts and literacy programs in public schools and libraries through the EJK Bookmaking Competition and Mini-Grant program; cultivates new writers and illustrators of exceptional picture books that reflect the experience of childhood in our diverse culture through the Ezra Jack Keats Book Award; and protects and promotes the work of Keats, whose book The Snowy Day broke the color barrier in children’s publishing.

The Snowy Day was adapted by Amazon as a holiday special, which earned two Daytime Emmys®, including Outstanding Preschool Children’s Animated Program; and was used as the subject of a set of Forever stamps issued by and still available from the United States Postal Service. To learn more about the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation, visit www.ezra-jack-keats.org.
Keats. Imagination. Diversity.